YAASS QUEEF!

YAASS QUEEF!

Let's clear the air on Queefing

MP EDITION 103

 


Our bodies do so much for us, and they make noises from time to time. Have you ever thought “did my vagina just fart?”, you’re probably not alone. It’s called Queefing or technically known as Vaginal flatulence and it’s completely natural. 

What is queefing?

Queefing is when a pocket of air exits the vagina suddenly with enough volume and force to make a sound. The vagina has folds so air easily gets trapped and when that happens, it has to get out eventually somehow.



While queefs are often referred to or likened to vaginal farts, they’re different. Farts occur when gas leaves your digestive tract. They’re caused when you swallow extra air (drinking fizzy drinks, chewing gum, or eating too fast) or when food breaks down in your intestines. 

When does queefing happen?

So we know how it happens, what about when? Anything that can cause air to get trapped in the vaginal canal can cause queefing. Queefing often occurs during sex, when a penis or toy goes in and out of the vagina, pushing air into it. 



Queefing during sex doesn’t always happen with a partner either. It’s very common to queef during a solo session if you’re placing an object like a sex toy inside your vagina. You generally won't feel it when air gets pushed into your vagina, you’d typically feel or hear it when it comes out. 



A queef can also slip out during exercise. When an air pocket gets trapped in your vagina, it has to come out eventually, maybe during your next exercise session, when you push the trapped air out as you flex or stretch, applying pressure to your vagina.



Other times you may let a queef out are during a pelvic exam or when you’re inserting a tampon or menstrual cup. Resist the urge to feel embarrassed. I assure you, it’s so common your gynecologist probably won’t even bat an eye. 


Is queefing dangerous?

Not at all. It's a normal passing of air. Unless it’s associated with an unusual discharge or odor, it’s not usually a cause for concern. 

Preventing queefing 

If queefing really bothers you, there are a few things you can try. 

  • Keep your partner's penis or a sex toy inside of you when you're changing positions to minimize the opportunity for air to get into the vagina
  • Limit in-and-out thrusting to decrease the likelihood of air getting loose. Try grinding in circular motions instead
  • Do kegels, which can help tone the pelvic floor, mitigating the chances of queefing


But most of all, remind yourself that queefing is perfectly normal. If you're worried your partner thinks you passed gas, just explain what's happening. 



But no matter which exit air escapes from, there's no reason to feel bad about it. We’re human and our bodies make all kinds of unique noises. Try to focus on the task at hand, whether that's having an orgasm or having a killer workout, rather than stressing about a completely natural thing your body does that you have no control over.



Really, you can’t control it, so it doesn’t need to be a big deal. It may be embarrassing, but it’s super common and most people have experienced it at some time or another. Don’t let it get in the way of a good time.

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